3 jul 09

http://www.uned.es/geo-1-historia-antigua-universal/MAGIA/LAMASHTU.htm

www.deliriumsrealm.com/delirium/articleview.a…


Pazuzu

Este casi desconocido demonio de la mitología  babilónica se representaba como un ser antropomorfo, alado, con pies en forma de garras de ave y cabeza de león.

Pazuzu


The demon first appeared in early Babylonian myth in the guise of the “storm-bird” Zu, who stole the Tablets of Destiny from the dragoness Tiamat. In the later Babylonian civilization, he once again appeared, this time under the name of Pazuzu, and was said to be the child of the chief wind-demon, Hanpa.

When Pazuzu is summoned by worshippers, he appears in a statuesque form, frozen into the position described above. After 1D4 rounds, however, he metamorphoses out of the statue form to his living form. In this form, he is fully capable of movement.

Several metal amulets depicting Pazuzu have been found. In all of these amulets, he is represented as appearing similar to the above description. Of these small (a few inches in height) amulets, an occasional magical one is found. The attached photograph depicts a non-magical amulet found in Iraq. The demon is aware whenever one of these amulets is handled. When this happens, an effective Mind Exchange spell is cast–usually it is the discoverer who is possessed, although not always. In cases of possession, Pazuzu’s victims use the demon’s STR, CON, INT, and POW.

Pazuzu’s worship has died off, for the most part, although isolated groups of worshippers can still be found in the Middle East, particularly among the violently anti-Israeli Sons of al-Azrad, reputedly sponsored by the Karotechia. Worship remains strong among ghouls, particularly those of European and Asian areas surrounding the Middle East. Some more enlightened New World ghouls worship Pazuzu, although most do not.

The Utukku, a race serving Pazuzu, are believed to be relatives or possibly a subspecies of ghoul.

PAZUZU, The Eagle, Unique Being
STR 40 CON 50 SIZ 19
INT 25 POW 35 DEX 10
Move 0 (1) HP 35

Damage Bonus: +3D6.
Weapons: Claw 65%, damage 1D10+3D6.
Bite 45%, damage 2D10.
Armor: 12-point rocky shell (2).
Spells: Implant Fear, Shrivelling, Summon/Bind Ghoul, Summon/Bind Utukku, Wither Limb, Wrack.
Sanity Loss: 1/1D10.
(1)In living form, Pazuzu has a move rate of 8/12 fly.
(2)In living form, Pazuzu sheds his rocky shell (causing 1D6 damage within a 2 yard radius) and has 6 points of leathery hide.

The Utukku
The Eagle’s Children, Lesser Servitor Race
Effectively identical to ghouls (see COC5.5), except with a move rate of 6/20 fly.


El Qishara
A ruined city in what is now Kuwait, El Qishara was the center of Pazuzu’s cult in ages past, when he had organized worshippers. That time has long since passed, and now the city of El Qishara is nearly consumed by the sands. Images of Pazuzu, identical to those found in the metal amulets but carved of weathered sandstone, glower menacingly over the entire city. The city is still favored by Pazuzu, however. El Qishara remains the only place on earth where unsummoned, naturally-occurring Utukku can be found. In addition, if someone tries to summon Pazuzu in these ruins, he or she gains a +45% bonus. Summon/Bind Utukku spells are automatically successful at El Qishara.

SPELLS OF THE PAZUZU CULT
Call/Dismiss Pazuzu
Enchant Pazuzu Amulet
Summon/Bind Utukku
Call/Dismiss Pazuzu: This spell functions identically to the Call/Dismiss spells outlined in CoC5. It must be cast, however, in a desert or otherwise arid region. If the caster is in close proximity to an image of Pazuzu, the spell’s chance of success increases by +20%; if an enchanted amulet, +25%.

Enchant Pazuzu Amulet: Used to make an enchanted amulet for either summoning of the Utukku or Pazuzu himself, as well as possession attacks. Requires the sacrifice of an animal of at least SIZ 6, with whose blood an image of Pazuzu must be anointed. The caster loses 1D4 temporary magic points, 2 POW, and 7 Sanity.

Summon/Bind Utukku: This spell functions as does a normal Summon/Bind spell. Like Call/Dismiss Pazuzu, an image of Pazuzu increases the chance of success by +20%.

Amuleto en forma de cabeza del demonio Pazuzu

Dioses, Diosas, Demonio y Monstruos

The Mesopotamian scribes compiled long lists of their gods. There were hundreds of gods who were responsible for every thing in the world, from rivers and mountains to making bread or pottery. The gods were known by different names depending on whether the scribes wrote Sumerian or Akkadian.

The following list of the most important gods, goddesses, demons and monsters uses their Akkadian names with their Sumerian names in brackets.

Adad (Ishkur)
Adad (Ishkur)
Amurru (Martu)
Amurru (Martu)
Anu
Anu (An)
Anzu
Anzu
Apkallu fish
Apkallu fish
Apkallu griffin
Apkallu griffin
Apkallu human
Apkallu human
Apsu (Abzu)
Apsu (Abzu)
Ashur
Ashur
Bull Man
Bull Man
Bull of Heaven
Bull of Heaven
Dumuzi
Dumuzi
Ea (Enki)
Ea (Enki)
Ellil (Enlil)
Ellil (Enlil)
Ereshkigal
Ereshkigal
Gula
Gula
Human-headed bull
Human-headed bulls
Humbaba (Huwawa)
Humbaba (Huwawa)
Ishtar (Inanna)
Ishtar (Inanna)
Lama
Lama
Lamashtu
Lamashtu
Lamassu
Lamassu
Marduk
Marduk
Mushhushshu
Mushhushshu
Nabu
Nabu
Nergal
Nergal
Ninhursag
Ninhursag
Ninurta
Ninurta
Pazuzu
Pazuzu
Scorpion People
Scorpion People
Shamash (Utu)
Shamash (Utu)
Sin (Nanna)
Sin (Nanna)
Tiamat
Tiamat
Ugallu
Ugallu
Usmu (Isimud)
Usmu (Isimud)
'Queen of the Night'
‘Queen of the Night’

Gods, Goddesses, Demons & Monsters homepage

Ancient Semitic Defenses against Demons

posted by Krista | 7/31/2006 7:05:07 PM | Permalink

With so many types of demons wrecking havoc on human lives, the Babylonians, Assyrians and early Jews concocted numerous ways to deal with their menacing foes. Common ways people protected themselves included carrying around an amulet such as a ring or inscribing various symbols or numbers on tablets or discs.

Later Jewish rituals were similar. They would hang aloes or cacti from the arch of their doorways to ward off evil spirits. They would also turn to God in prayer, often quoting passages from Scripture such as the Aaronic blessing of Numbers 6:22-27

Then the LORD spoke to Moses, saying,

“Speak to Aaron and to his sons, saying, ‘Thus you shall bless the sons of Israel. You shall say to them:
The LORD bless you, and keep you;
The LORD make His face shine on you,
And be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance on you,
And give you peace.’

“So they shall (H)invoke My name on the sons of Israel, and I then will bless them.”
- Numbers 6:22-27

Other frequently quoted passages included repetition of the Shema Deuteronomy 6:4-9, 11:13-21 and Numbers 15:37-41.

Because demons were thought to gravitate towards food and water, Jews would guard themselves by striking the cover of the water-jar and say to themselves

Thou N son of N [ie himself],thy mother has warned thee, and said, Guard thyself from Shabriri, Briri, Riri, Iri, Ri. I am thirsty in a white cup.

It was believed that as the person recited the syllables of the demon’s name, the demon also faded away - demonstrating how powerful words can be.

Referencewww.deliriumsrealm.com/delirium/articleview.a…

PAZUZU 1, 2,  LAMASSU

MUHUSSU, ANIMAL DE de MARDUK

LAMASHTU-PAZUZU y  la llamada ” Placa del Infierno”

La llamada Placa del Infierno,Louvre

Data: c. -700.
Etapa cultural: Época asiria

Labartu, Lamashtu (Lamaštu), en acadio o Dimme en sumerio,  era unndemonio femenino que causaba fiebres, especialmente en los niños. En el  registro superior, sacerdotes-médicos vestidos de pez  realizan un exorcismo; en el registro inferior, la  Labartu  está representada sobre una barca.

Infra,

“Labartu” en caracteres cuneiformes:

origem

Placa de la Lamashtu


Lamashtu, staand op een ezel, in haar handen twee slagen, terwijl een hond aan borsten zuigt. Mesopotamië, 800 v.o.j.Lamasjtoe. Lamashtu. Mesopotamische godin. Haar Soemerische naam is Dimme. Vaak wordt naar haar verwezen als demoon, maar uit de spelling van haar naam in spijkerschrift wordt afgeleid dat ze in Babylon en Assyrië als een godin werd vereerd.
Lamashtu was de dochter van de hemelgod Anu (de Soemerische An). Ze doodt moeders in het kraambed, veroorzaakte misgeboortes en bedreigde het leven van kinderen met ziektes. Ze dronk het bloed van mannen en verslond hun vlees. Ze verstoorde de slaap en veroorzaakte nachtmerries. Ze werd vaak omschreven als ‘zeven heksen’.
Ze wordt vaak afgebeeld met ontblote borsten, waaraan een hond en een varken worden gezoogd. Ook kwam ze op amuletten voor als vrouw met het hoofd van een leeuw of vogel, die knielde op een ezel.
In beschrijvingen komt ze voor met het een leeuwenhoofd, ezeltanden, naakte borsten en een harig lichaam, vlekkerige handen, lange vingers en nagels, en met vogelklauwen. Haar heilige dier is een ezel, waarop ze op afbeeldingen staat. Ze draagt twee slangen in haar handen.
Lamashtu is verwant aan Laima en Medusa uit de Griekse mythologie, en aan de Hebreeuwse Lilith. Clytaemnestra werd geplaagd door een nachtmerrie die met wezens als Lamashtu of Lamia kan worden geassocieerd.

Comprar Ahora

———————-

–                                                                   Dra. Ana Mª Vázquez Hoys

Historia de las Religiones Antiguas. Tomo I. (Próximo Oriente). Editorial Sanz y Torres, Madrid, Febrero 2006.

Filed under: General,MITOLOGÍA,R. Próximo Oriente,RELIGIONES ANTIGUAS

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